Mototrbo used at West Tennessee Healthcare

You’ve probably stumbled upon this looking for information about earpiece‘s, hopefully this will help you answer some of those questions, if not please click on one of the relevant links within the article

headset. earphonesWest Tennessee Healthcare (WTH) needed a two-way solution that would ensure exceptionally clear and efficient communications to all parts of the property. They had an aging analog system in place, and they wanted to be sure that in the days to come, they’d be well positioned to migrate the whole system seamlessly to digital.

A Communications System in Need of Care

The 50-acre WTH campus is scheduled to expand by more than 20 acres to meet the growing need for healthcare services in the area. As the facility spreads out over the property, the communications system must grow with it; the existing analog system was simply not up to the challenge of accommodating users who needed new applications to do their jobs with greater efficiency.

Currently, there are 40 structures on campus, including 13 multi-story buildings. One of the bigger buildings is the Jackson-Madison County General Hospital, which had a communications system based on seven analog repeaters, serving 350 portable radios across the property. The security department had a number of older radios that needed replacement, and those in charge had some very specific requirements for the new system.

Those requirements were articulated by James E. Ross, Vice President of WTH, who explained “there were two very important things that we needed to consider. One, we needed something that would be expandable; two, we needed the ability to send and receive private messages.”

“I put it in my guys’ hands and we tried it out all over the hospital, including the basement, tunnels, places where we’ve had poor reception in the past. We have some huge generators in equipment rooms and we put guys in between those, and we got clear reception everywhere we went with it.”
Diagnosis, Demonstration and Deployment

The most efficient way to introduce MOTOTRBO to WTH was to diagnose their needs and arrange a demonstration of MOTOTRBO’s ability to meet those needs.

According to Eddie Wood, Security Coordinator for WTH, the demonstration could not have gone better. “I put it in my guys’ hands,” said Wood, “and we tried it out all over the hospital, including the basement, tunnels, places where we’ve had poor reception in the past. We have some huge generators in equipment rooms and we put guys in between those, and we got clear reception everywhere we went with it.” With the digital difference, MOTOTRBO provides much clearer audio quality than is possible with analog, especially in fringe coverage areas.

Once MOTOTRBO was selected, migration was very simple. MOTOTRBO supports dual mode analog and digital operations to enable backwards communication with analog radios already in place. In this way, WTH could buy a few MOTOTRBO radios and use them in the analog mode; then, over time and as budget allowed, they could start migrating a few radios at a time to digital. As part of the initial deployment, the analog repeater was removed and replaced with a MOTOTRBO digital repeater. The MOTOTRBO system blended perfectly

with an existing combiner and bidirectional amplifier.

“After we got done testing the demo,” Wood explains, “I got to talking to the guys, and they didn’t want to give up their MOTOTRBO radios. They loved the product; they asked, “Do we have to give them back?” That was all WTH needed to know; MOTOTRBO was the right radio system for them.
Prescription for Expandable, Secure Communications
MOTOTRBO is a forward-compatible platform, and investing in MOTOTRBO is an excellent way to lay a foundation for future growth. Ross explains that “MOTOTRBO has enhanced our communications capability by adding more frequencies without our having to increase our licenses.”

MOTOTRBO is able to double the capacity of the existing radio system at WTH, replacing analog repeaters with MOTOTRBO repeaters while continuing to use existing frequencies. Using TDMA technology, MOTOTRBO delivers two times the previous analog capacity without changing the FCC-allocated frequency; this extra capacity can be used for more voice traffic, dedicated data traffic or a combination of both. TDMA enables WTH to utilize the licensed frequency while taking advantage of an extra

timeslot for sophisticated, value-added functionality, without causing any additional interference.

Having clear communications ensures security for everyone and despite the increase in capacity made possible through MOTOTRBO, there was no decrease in communications quality. Digital signal
are inherently clearer than analog signals, and noise suppression technology makes MOTOTRBO audio even crisper and sharper. When he first tried the radio, Ross explains “I was able to make a crystal clear connection with our central control dispatch”; there was just no comparison between the scratchiness of old analog radios and the

incredible clarity of MOTOTRBO.

Clear communications support the safety and security of everyone on campus, and MOTOTRBO has additional features that provide an extra measure of safety assurance for security personnel. “One
of the main concerns I had,” explains Wood, “was for the safety of my officers, and this system has emergency signaling that lets me know which officer is down so everyone can respond to it.” Wood is also excited about text messaging and battery life.

Text messaging enables any phone or computer to send an email to a MOTOTRBO host server application, which then forwards the text message to designated MOTOTRBO subscriber units, supporting tighter, more coordinated communications management.

MOTOTRBO and all digital radios provide improved battery life. WTH personnel reportedly receive up to 18 hours of operation after quick-charging a standard nickel metal hydride battery, much more than is available with many analog radios. Because digital systems use batteries more efficiently than analog systems, talk-time is extended, so personnel spend less time returning to base to recharge their units or pick up fresh batteries.

MOTOTRBO – Restoring Health to Aging Communications Systems
Designed to facilitate quick and easy migration, and to be used in even mixed analog and digital environments, MOTOTRBO’s digital technology enables it to adapt to a number of different work environments, seamlessly supporting industry-specific applications, and it has proven to be an exceptionally productive communications tool. In addition to the applications deployed by West Tennessee Healthcare, the digital platform can

support location tracking via built-in GPS so that the location of field units is displayed on the dispatcher’s computer screen for more efficient operations and tighter asset management. GPS-based Location Services is just one of MOTOTRBO’s continuing series of remarkable applications – made possible through digital technology – that extend the power of MOTOTRBO, enabling it to be customized to work at maximum efficiency in any environment,

in any industry.

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Making “Her” Into Reality

audioAgain a new short article i found interesting on the issue of earpiece’s, what would you do if i didn’t post this ehh? youd have to look at the initial content, and the chances you found it would be slim, so deem yourself blessed that ive shared this wonderful piece with you.

Spike Jonze’s latest movie, “Her,” creates a future where technology is less visible, yet more ubiquitous than today. The main character uses an earpiece and handheld device to communicate with an operating system that follows a user across any platform, rarely utilizing the traditional desktop screens except when at work. And the main way of interacting with the operating system is through natural, conversational speech.

Even though it is science fiction, “Her” seems to be the end state for many current acquisitions and research from real-life tech companies. These companies are pursuing enhanced artificial intelligence and speech recognition. And the companies who don’t jump on this future will be left in the digital dust.

Established artificial intelligence
The most well-known characters in AI today are IBM’s Watson and Apple’s Siri.

Watson takes human’s natural language and filters through data to find the most probable answers. It can take “unstructured data,” that is, data computers typically cannot read because it isn’t structured in tables, rows, or columns, and turn it into knowledge accessible not through complex queries but simple, vocal questions. It’s now being used to help doctors find better cancer treatments and financial planners find better investments. IBM hopes Watson will bring in $1 billion in revenue by 2018.

Siri first debuted in Apple’s iPhone 4S, allowing for simple functions like searching the web and initiating a call or writing a text message. The latest iOS version added more functionality for Siri, like sourcing information from Wikipedia and Twitter.

Apple’s latest acquisitions point to further enhancements for Siri. In 2013, the company picked up intelligent calendar application Cue, which helps layout a user’s day similar to Google Now. It also bought Topsy, which allowed customers to analyze and search social posts. And, a recently published patent points to expanding Siri from phones to docks.

Up and coming AI
Now, Google spent a rumored $400 million on an artificial intelligence company called DeepMind. DeepMind’s website describes its software as useful in “simulations, e-commerce, and games,” and the company has an impressive talent list with a former child chess prodigy and a Skype co-creator. This piles on to Google’s other recent acquisitions of robot maker Boston Dynamics and smart home hardware maker Nest. If Google can succeed in integrating these seemingly disparate companies, it seems like having a conversation with your thermostat isn’t too far off.

Losers of an AI future
While these companies are priming themselves to own any science fiction-like future, there are companies doomed to languish if they don’t change their path.

This includes the lowly hardware maker. The future presented in “Her” doesn’t contain several devices in multiple form factors as we have now, but one handheld device and one wearable earpiece that connects to a cloud-based operating system. IBM, a case study in staying relevant, keeps shedding its hardware operations with its latest $2.3 billion sale of its server business to Lenovo. As the main players build their artificially intelligent ecosystems, the hardware becomes less important as it’s commoditized, and the main differentiation becomes software. Companies might also want more control over their hardware and the user experience, and produce their own. For example, Apple recently purchased a cutting-edge chip maker, Primesense. Microsoft stepped into producing its own hardware with its Surface tablets.

Just a movie?
On the other hand, “Her,” like most future predictions, could be far off base. While it seems artificial intelligence will play a large role in future computing, we may combine such technology with even more screens. The point where computers become more intelligent than humans, called the singularity, may not come as quickly as predicted, and these future bets may be too far off to have any impact on company values today.

If you have any thoughts regarding where and how to use 2 way radio Earpieces, you can call us at the website.

Police hearing loss compensation ‘extortionate’

Some of these pro writers on the web are at such a high level that i wonder if any of them have ever printed a paperback? so from time to time i like to highlight these excellent articles and here is one i thought was remarkable the other day.

The amount of compensation paid to former police officers who said their hearing was damaged while on duty is “extortionate”, Sinn F訮 has said.
The settlement for 8,641 former officers has cost £135m, with more than £65m of this going on legal fees.
Sinn F訮 MLA Pat Sheehan said the officers were “well paid” and the figure was “clearly unjustifiable”.
However, former detective superintendent Alan Mains said it was justified on medical grounds.
“Collectively speaking, it looks like a phenomenal sum. But it could have been dealt with a lot differently… if they had taken a broad common sense approach, instead of challenging medical evidence,” he said.
Continue reading the main story Hearing loss payouts
Total amount paid to settle cases: £135,357,689

Damages paid to former officers: £70,161,788

Legal and court costs: £65,195,901
Figures run to November 2013
“The reason why we had to carry guns in the first place is pretty obvious – we were the only police service in all of the UK (to have to do so).”
Ulster Unionist MLA Ross Hussey, who is a former RUC officer and a current member of the Policing Board, said he did not understand Sinn F訮’s criticism.
“There is a clear negligence on the part of the employer, who were the Police Authority/Policing Board, and therefore there is a legitimate claim,” he said.
“I find it strange for Sinn F訮 to condemn this because in any other circumstances, an employee who has an injury on duty has a right to claim against their employer.”
Firearms training Please turn on JavaScript. Media requires JavaScript to play.
Pat Sheehan said officers were “well paid” and the figure was “clearly unjustifiable”
The payment was criticised by SDLP assembly member Alban Maginness, who said it was a “shocking figure”.
“The Policing Board and the Department of Justice have questions to answer about how this was allowed to happen,” he said.
“The police could have taken a much broader approach instead of contesting every case, when medical evidence had been provided stating that there had been hearing loss.
“That would have saved a substantial sum of money.”
As the only routinely armed police force in the UK, the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) officers had to undergo regular firearms training.
Since the late 1960s, police sources were aware of medical evidence that sufficient ear protection was needed, but the RUC did not provide this for another three decades.
Details of the payments were revealed by the PSNI in response to a Freedom of Information request by Belfast-based victims group Relatives for Justice.
The figures run up to the end of November, with hundreds of other claims pending.
More than 10,000 former RUC officers have lodged claims for damages, saying their hearing was damaged.
The claims include officers who claim to have suffered hearing loss as a result of frequent radio use, while being transported in helicopters and while driving motorcycles.
However, the vast majority of claims are for damage caused during firearms training.
In a statement, the PSNI said: “All hearing loss claims have to be thoroughly investigated.
“The chief constable is fully aware of his responsibility to the public purse and the strategy for handling hearing loss litigation has been kept under review by the Chief Constable’s lawyers and the Crown Solicitor’s Office with the aim of ensuring that claims are dealt with as economically as is possible given the technical aspects of the cases and the individual circumstances of each.”
The PSNI also said all legal costs were closely scrutinised and “have been challenged by the Chief Constable’s lawyers when appropriate”.